Questions and Answers about Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)

pepPEP is the use of antiretroviral drugs after a single high-risk exposure to HIV in an attempt to prevent HIV from replicating and establishing itself as an infection in the body of the person possibly infected with HIV. PEP should be started as soon as possible to be effective - and always within 3 days of a possible exposure. If you think you may have been exposed to HIV very recently, see a doctor as soon as possible to find out if PEP is the right choice for you.

What is PEP?

PEP means postexposure prophylaxis *. It consists of taking antiretroviral drugs as soon as possible but no more than 72 hours (3 days) after you may have been exposed to HIV, to try to reduce the chance of becoming HIV-positive. These medicines prevent HIV from making copies of itself and spreading through your body. Two or three drugs are usually prescribed, and they should be taken during 28 days. PEP is definitely not always effective; it is not a guarantee that someone exposed to HIV will not be infected with HIV. Editor's Note: This is why I reinforce: Always use condom correctly; it is not certain that the PEP will work and only a card crazy would make a bet of this level.

Is PEP suitable for me?

Doctor's hand with blood samplePEP is used for those who may have been exposed to HIV very recently, during a single event. It is not the right choice for people who can be exposed to HIV often.

Your health care provider will study whether PEP is the right choice for you based on the risk of your exposure.

Health workers are evaluated for PEP if they are exposed to blood or body fluids from a patient who is infected with HIV. The risk of HIV infection in this way is less than 1 in 100 exposures.

PEP can also be used to treat people who may have been exposed to HIV during a single non-work event (eg, unprotected sex, needle sharing, or sexual violence).

Keep in mind that PEP should only be used in situations immediately after a potential exposure to HIV. It is not a substitute for regular use of other HIV prevention methods, such as the correct and consistent use of condoms or the use of sterile injection equipment in the case of injecting drug use.

If you receive a PEP prescription, you will be asked to return for HIV testing from 4 to 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after exposure to HIV. Because PEP is not always effective, you should continue to use a condom with sexual partners at the same time you use PEP and you should not share with other injection equipment if you consume injecting drugs (Editor's note: Okay, I have nothing with that, but ... in my opinion, is the end of drug sting)

When should I take PEP?

PEPs should start within 72 at most hours after exposure, before the virus takes time to make many copies of itself in its body and settle such as infection.

PEP as soon as possible after possible exposure to HIV is important: research has shown that PEP has little or no effect on preventing HIV infection if it is initiated more than 72 hours after exposure to HIV.

HIV makes copies of itself once it enters your body, and it takes about 3 days for these copies to spread through your body. When HIV is only in some cells where it has been introduced into your body, it can sometimes be controlled by the immune system backed by PEP, but when it occupies many cells in many places in your body, PEP will not workr.

Two or three drugs are usually prescribed, and they should be taken during 28 days.

Do PEP have side effects?

PEP is safe, but it can cause side effects like nausea in some people. These side effects can be treated and are not life threatening.

Where can I get PEP?

Some of the places that you can go to seek treatment include your doctor's office, emergency room, emergency room care at clinics, venues or from centers specializing in HIV. {Editor's note: At the end of the text I will put three addresses in São Paulo and I ask people to read this text and they know of other points where PEP can be obtained to send these places through the system of comments of the blog that I will put the addresses in the same list. Please help to try and save more people ...}

Can I take a round of PEP every time I have unprotected sex?

PEP should only be used immediately after a rare situation with potential exposure to HIV. If you are often exposed to HIV for example because you often have unprotected sex with a partner who is HIV-positive, repeated use of PEP is not the right choice. This is because, when drugs are given only after exposure, more drugs and larger doses are needed to block infection than when they are started prior to exposure and continued for a while thereafter. It is an approach called Pre-exposure prophylaxis, Or PrEP; PrEP means taking a Truvada tablet daily for months or years. This keeps medication in your body to prevent HIV from making copies of itself and installing itself as infection by your body whenever you are exposed. If you are at ongoing risk for HIV, talk to your doctor about PrEP or click here to learn more about PEP.

Locations in Sao Paulo - Capital

House of AIDS - Ferreira Street Araújo- Health Center near Sink phone Street: 30341444

Translated from the original in English located on the link PEP by Cláudio S Souza

As we do not respect our language and we do not use the correct acronym that would be PPE, I am forced to translate that way. The same thing, as an example, we have for the United States, that I learned in school that the acronym would be US we used, improperly US the USA)

Yes, this is the photo of me! My niece asked me to put this picture on my profile! .... I had here a description of me that one person described as "irreverent". This is really a euphemistic way of classifying what was here. All I know is that an "NGO" which occupies a building of 10 floors has established a partnership with me, and I have the logs of the partnership time, which was more a vampirism because for each 150 people leaving my site, clicking on them, there was, on average, one that came in. WHEN I ENTERED AND ENTERED