There is life with HIV

NIH scientists have identified potent neutralizing antibodies almost all strains of HIV - perhaps closer to a vaccine

The discovery and characterization of this antibody
The discovery and characterization of this antibody with such force and such spectral amplitude HIV can lead to prevention strategies and treatments more effective against HIV
NIAID Director Anthony S. Faucy, MD

Scientists from the National Institutes of Health have identified an antibody from a person infected with HIV that potently neutralized 98 percent of isolated strains of HIV have tested, including 16 20 of strains resistant to other antibodies of the same class. The remarkable breadth and power of this antibody, called N6, makes it an attractive candidate for development of a drug / vaccine potentially capable of treating or preventing HIV infection, the researchers say.

The scientists, led by Mark Connors, MD, of the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), also accompanied the evolution of N6 over time to understand how it developed the ability to neutralize almost all strains of HIV. This information will help to idealize the design of vaccines to trigger the onset detais broadly neutralizing antibodies.

Identification of neutralizing antibodies against HIV in general has been difficult because the virus rapidly changes its surface proteins as a way to escape an already described here "arms race recognition by the immune system. "

"Translator's note: viral envelope is the envelope or external capsule to the capsid, the virus present. Its composition is based mainly glycoproteins and phospholipids, which are derived from the host cell structures such as plasma membrane and organelles. Cut out is setting a stub said viral envelope. Click on the image to learn more
"Translator's note: viral envelope is the envelope or external capsule to the capsid, the virus present. Its composition is based mainly glycoproteins and phospholipids, which are derived from the host cell structures such as plasma membrane and organelles. Cut out is setting a stub said viral envelope. Click on the image to learn more

In 2010, scientists at the Research Center of the vaccine (NIAID VRC) discovered an antibody called VRC01 able to prevent up to ninety percent of viral strains of the human immunodeficiency virus to infect human cells. As VRC01, N6 blocks infection by binding to a portion of the HIV envelope calledbinding site CD4, Preventing the virus from attaching to immune cells to.

The findings of this study showed that N6 evolved from a single binding mode that is less dependent on a viral envelope area variable of HIV, known as V5 region and focuses more on regions which has changed relatively little among strains of HIV. This allows the N6 can tolerate changes in the HIV envelope, including glucose attachment regions in V5 an important mechanism by which develops resistance to other HIV antibodies VRC01 class.

The new findings suggest that N6can represent advantages over VRC01, which is currently being assessed by venous infusion in clinical trials to see if it can safely prevent HIV infection in humans. Because of its potency, the N6 antibody can provide a stronger and more durable response in the prevention and treatment and other benefits is that researchers will be able to administer subcutaneously (fat beneath the skin) rather than via venous (would be more or less as I do, applying four injections of Clexane © ®. in addition, their ability to neutralize almost all strains of HIV would be advantageous for both prevention strategies and treatment.

Translated by Claudio Souza the original NIH Scientists Identify Potent Antibody Neutralizes que Nearly All HIV Strains

reviewed by Bob Volpe - Tantum Nominum Nulum pair Elogium

ARTICLE:
J Huang, BH Kang, and Ishida, T Zhou et al. Identification of the CD4-binding site antibody to HIV que evolvednear-pan neutralizationbreadth. Immunity DOI: 10.1016 / j.immuni.2016.10.027 (2016).

WHO:
NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD, isavailable to comment on the research. Mark Connors, MD, chief of the HIV-SpecificImmunitySection in NIAID'sLaboratory of Immunoregulation and the seniorauthor of the paper, alsoisavailable.

The researchteamincludedscientists from NIAID'sLaboratory of Immunoregulation and Vaccine Research Center.

Content last reviewed on November 15, 2016

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