Atazanavir / Reyataz Other Antiretroviral A Protease Inhibitor

Image default
Antiretrovirals antiretroviral Viral Load Sorodiscordant couples HIV infection Youth and AIDS What is CD4

Atazanavir is a protease inhibitor. These are the new remedies that Dráuzio Varella does in a video. However, Atazanavir is much newer and better prepared. Does it have inconvenient side effects?

Yes!

But much more Lights than the ones Mara and I took one day.

Atazanavir / Reyataz

What is atazanavir?

Atazanavir is a medicine used to treat HIV. It is marketed under the brand name. Reyataz, but generic versions are also available. It is taken in combination with other antiretroviral medicines.

The usual dose of atazanavir in adults is 300 mg once daily. This can be taken as a capsule of 300 mg taken with 10 mg of ritonavir (to be translated) (a medicine potentiator). Alternatively, the combined pill EvotazContains atazanavir 300mg and cobicistat 150mg (also to translate) - this is done in alphabetical order, according to my sources, (an enhancer drug) and this can be taken once a day.

Atazanavir

How does atazanavir work?

Atazanavir is a class of drugs known as protease inhibitors. Your doctor will prescribe atazanavir as part of your HIV treatment along with antiretrovirals from another class of medications. It is important to take all the prescribed medications every day. Each class of drugs works against HIV in a different way.

The goal of HIV treatment is to reduce the level of HIV in your body (viral load). Ideally, your viral load should be so low that it is undetectable - usually less than 50 copies of viruses per ml of blood. Taking HIV treatment and having an undetectable viral load protects the immune system and prevents HIV from being transmitted to another person during sex.

Atazanavir

How can I take atazanavir?

You should take atazanavir with a large meal or snack to help your body absorb the drug.

Treatment for HIV works best if you take it every day. When would be a good time for you to plan the treatment? Think about your daily routine and when you find it easier to do the treatment.

If you forget to take a dose of atazanavir, take it as soon as you remember the food. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule.

If you regularly forget to take the treatment or if you are not taking it for another reason, it is important to talk to your doctor about it.

Atazanavir

What are the possible side effects of atazanavir?

All drugs have possible side effects. IS It's a good idea to talk to your doctor about possible side effects before you start taking a medicine. If you feel something that could be a side effect, talk to your doctor about what can be done. A full list of side effects, including less common side effects, should be included in the package insert accompanying the atazanavir package.

In general, we divide the side effects into two types:

Common - a side effect that occurs in at least one in 100 people (over 1%) who take this medicine.

Rare - a side effect that occurs in less than one in 100 people (less than 1%) who take this medicine.

The common side effects of atazanavir include:

  • headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, indigestion, tiredness, rash, increased bilirubin levels, sometimes leading to jaundice.

When taken as Evotaz, some other side effects are reported to be common, including:

  • increased appetite, difficulty sleeping, abnormal dreams, dizziness, change in taste, swelling, flatulence, dry mouth.

Developing a little yellowing of the skin and / or eyes (jaundice) is quite common when taking atazanavir, especially when you first start the medicine. While this may seem alarming, it is harmless and does not mean that your liver is damaged or does not work at all.

Rarely, atazanavir can cause a hypersensitivity (allergic) reaction. If you develop a rash with other symptoms such as fever, see a doctor.

vAtazanavir

Does atazanavir interact with other drugs?

You should always tell your doctor and pharmacist about any other medicines or medicines you are taking. This includes anything prescribed by another doctor, medications you have purchased from a street chemist, herbal and alternative treatments, and recreational or chems drugs.

Some medicines or medications are unsafe if taken together - the interaction may cause increased and dangerous levels, or may prevent one or both medicines from working. Other drug interactions are less dangerous but still need to be taken seriously. If drug levels are affected, you may need to change the dose you take. This should be done only on the advice of your HIV doctor.

A list of medicines known to interact with atazanavir should be included in the package leaflet that accompanies atazanavir. Tell your doctor if you are taking any of these medicines and other medicines that are not on the list.

You should not take atazanavir with any of the following medicines:

  • alfuzosin
  • astemizole
  • bepridil
  • cisapride
  • dihydroergotamine
  • ergonovine
  • ergotamine
  • thanks again
  • lovastatin
  • methylergonovine
  • midazolam (oral)
  • pimozide
  • quetiapine
  • quinidine
  • rifampicin
  • sildenafil (when used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension)
  • simvastatin
  • herb of St
  • terfenadine
  • triazolamone.

If you are taking atazanavir, it is especially important to consult your doctor or pharmacist for HIV before taking any other medicines because they may interact with atazanavir or ritonavir or colbicistate enhancers.

Drugs that affect the acidity of the stomach and gastrointestinal tract may prevent atazanavir from being absorbed, which means that it may not be effective in suppressing HIV. These include indigestion and heartburn remedies, proton pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. Talk to your doctor if you take these types of drugs, even if only occasionally.

Atazanavir

Can I take atazanavir in pregnancy?

If you are thinking about having a baby, or think you may be pregnant, talk to your doctor as soon as possible about which combination of anti-HIV drugs would be right for you. It is important to take antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy to avoid HIV transmission from the mother to the baby.

The British HIV Association (BHIVA) recommends that women who are already taking anti-HIV drugs and who become pregnant should continue to take the same medication during pregnancy. In addition, BHIVA lists atazanavir (in combination with other medicines) as an option that may be recommended for women initiating HIV treatment during pregnancy, depending on their individual circumstances.

Women living with HIV are advised not to breastfeed because HIV can be transmitted in breast milk. However, some women choose to breastfeed. Atazanavir should not be used during breastfeeding, since a small amount of the drug may pass into breast milk.

Atazanavir

What are the possible side effects of atazanavir?

All drugs have possible side effects. It is a good idea to talk to your doctor about possible side effects before you start taking a medicine. If you feel something that could be a side effect, talk to your doctor about what can be done. A full list of side effects, including less common side effects, should be included in the package insert accompanying the atazanavir package.

In general, we divide the side effects into two types:

Common - a side effect that occurs in at least one in 100 people (over 1%) who take this medicine.

Rare - a side effect that occurs in less than one in 100 people (less than 1%) who take this medicine.

The common side effects of atazanavir include:

  • headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, indigestion, tiredness, rash, increased levels of bilirubin, sometimes leading to jaundice.

When taken as Evotaz, some other side effects are reported to be common, including:

  • increased appetite, difficulty sleeping, abnormal dreams, dizziness, change in taste, swelling, flatulence, dry mouth.

Developing a little yellowing of the skin and / or eyes (jaundice) is quite common when taking atazanavir, especially when you first start the medicine. While this may seem alarming, it is harmless and does not mean that your liver is damaged or does not work at all.

Atazanavir

Rarely, atazanavir can cause a hypersensitivity (allergic) reaction. If you develop a rash with other symptoms such as fever, see a doctor.

Can children take atazanavir?

Atazanavir is approved for use in children aged 6 or older. The Reyataz Powder is also available for children over 3 months.

Talking to your doctor

If you have any concern about your treatment or with other aspects of your health, it is important to talk to your doctor about them.

For example, if you have a symptom or side effect, or if you have trouble getting the treatment every day, it is important that your doctor knows that. If you are taking any other medications or recreational drugs, or if you have another medical condition, this is also important for your doctor to know.

Building a relationship with a doctor can take time. You may feel very comfortable talking to your doctor, but some people find this harder, especially when it comes to sex, mental health or symptoms that they find embarrassing. It's also easy to forget the things you wanted to talk about.

PrEP

Preparing for an appointment can be very helpful. Take some time to think about what you are going to say. You may find it helpful to talk to someone first or make some notes and take them to your appointment. Our online tool The conversation points can help you prepare for your next appointment - visit www.aidsmap.com/talking-points

For more detailed information on this medicine, visit asdo atazanavir antiretroviral drugs in AZ.

Translated by Cláudio Afonso de Souza do Original in Atazanavir On 19 June 2019.

Originally Posted by Greta Hughson

THE RESILIENCE IS SOMETHING YOU BUILD ONE DAY EVERY TIME.

When the path becomes difficult, we can only harden the journey!

Atazanavir

A serious opportunistic illness: TB is a defining disease of AIDS

The texts below may interest you!

Hi! Your opinion always matters. Got something to say? Is here! Any questions? We can start here!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your feedback data is processed.

Automattic, Wordpress and Soropositivo.Org, and I, do everything in our power regarding your privacy. And we are always improving, improving, testing and implementing new data protection technologies. Your data is protected, and I, Claudio Souza, work on this blog 18 hours or day to, among many other things, ensure the security of your information, since I know the implications and complications of past and exchanged publications. I accept the Privacy Policy of Soropositivo.Org Know Our Privacy Policy

%d Bloggers like this: